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In Her Image PROGRAM

VOX honors women in all their glory in this beautiful concert featuring a new piece from Jocelyn Hagen. From extraordinary women like Katherine Johnson, the first African American woman to work for NASA, to women who face everyday struggles and triumph.


The concert celebrates the infinite possibilities in every woman and serves as a preview of the choir’s Carnegie Hall debut!

For a printable pdf version of the program, please click HERE. 

WELCOME

Welcome letter from Rebecca TBC

PROGRAM NOTES

By Holley Replogle-Wong

Your World Your World is as big as you make it. I know, for I used to abide In the narrowest nest in a corner, My wings pressing close to my side But I sighted the distant horizon Where the skyline encircled the sea And I throbbed with a burning desire To travel this immensity I battered the cordons around me And cradled my wings on the breeze, Then soared to the uttermost reaches With rapture, with power, with ease! -Georgia Douglas Johnson (1880-1966) VOX Femina Los Angeles presents a concert that celebrates the strength, resilience, and creativity of women. From NASA scientists and mathematicians to Harlem Renaissance poets, from freedom fighters to everyday survivors – the themes of this concert express a variety of experiences with a unifying message of the hope and freedom that emerge from the support of community. As ever, this expression of community is eloquently performed through the act of communal singing and listening. In keeping with our identity as a choral ensemble that contributes to our community through the encouragement of living compositional voices, many of the works featured in this concert are recent or brand new commissions. Carnegie Hall Festival Chorus We commence with “One With the Wind”, a piece commissioned by VOX Femina Los Angeles in 2014, featuring text by Larissa FastHorse and David O, and music by David O. The text includes words in Lakota which define circles of community. Misnala, as sung by the soloist, refers to herself. She is joined by a trio singing Tiwahe – representing her immediate family. Then her extended family, her friends, her colleagues appear, announcing themselves with the word Tioshpaye, “to be part of a circle.” Finally, her circle broadens to include her people, her nation: Oyate. Together, these circles of community bolster the individual and support each other, rallying with the phrase “Hoka Hey”, which Larissa FastHorse explains is used in this piece to “urge a person forward (like into battle) with a confidence that they have lived their lives so well that every day is as good a day to live or die as any other because the person is already walking on the good Red Road (the right path).” Marie-Claire Sandon refers to her piece “The Girl with the Numbers” as a “miniature portrait” of NASA research mathematician Katherine Johnson. In her notes on the piece, Sandon highlights Johnson’s accomplishments: …On February 20th 1962, John Glenn was the first American to launch into space and orbit the Earth. Friendship 7’s success heavily depended on the exactitude of the rocket trajectory’s calculations. A few days prior to the mission, Glenn trusted his life with only one person to confirm by hand these IBM-generated numbers: Katherine Johnson, 44 year-old mathematician; daughter, sister, widow, wife, mother of three, friend, teacher, community-builder, chorister; the first woman – and African-American woman – to join NASA’s Space Flight Research Division in Langley’s Memorial Aeronautical Laboratory as research mathematician, and who was part of the Space Task Group for America’s first multiple missions to space. Human computer. “The girl with the numbers”. Born in 1918, West Virginia, Katherine Johnson lived in a time and place where social norms were being questioned for both women and Black people. Having been denied an education higher than grade 6 himself, Johnson’s father armed her with many tools. One that would propel her beyond many challenges was the following lesson: “You are no better than anybody, but nobody’s better than you.”… “I loved numbers and numbers loved me. They followed me everywhere. No matter what I did, I was always finding something to count [...]”. In the end, Johnson got to live her dream as a research mathematician. This choral piece is my reaction to reading her YA-oriented autobiography, Reaching For The Moon. May her story continue to inspire women and men, young and old alike. “I Want to Die While You Love Me” was commissioned by the 2013 ACDA Women’s Choir Commission Consortium, including VOX Femina Los Angeles. In this piece, composer Rosephanye Powell sets the passionate words of Harlem Renaissance playwright, writer, and poet Georgia Douglas Johnson that were published as part of her 1928 volume An Autumn Love Cycle. The text describes a perfect day with a beloved – one that she wishes to never be spoiled by the passage of time: “I want to die while you love me and never, never see the glory of this perfect day grow dim or cease to be.” Powell starts this piece as a duet, as if between two lovers, then allows the harmony to blossom and the emotion to intensify. The wave ultimately breaks with a gentle reminder of the lyric motto to end the piece. Jocelyn Hagen’s “Searching For Dark Matter” was commissioned by National Concerts in honor of VOX Femina’s Carnegie Hall performance. For this special work, Hagen adapted text written by Rebecca Elson (1960-1999). Elson was an astronomer and a writer, and her poems were published posthumously after her early death from cancer at age 39. Drawing upon her extensive background in physics and astronomy, her poems express the breathless wonder born from scientific exploration. In these lyrics, the life cycles of stars are made akin to human experience: the coldness of impending loss is tempered by hope in a universe that goes on in spite of death, that there may be “always a star where we can warm ourselves.” The piece starts out contemplative, with an alto flute in dialogue with the voice, and vibraphone and glockenspiel adding a touch of celestial to the soundscape. As hope builds, the tempo gradually accelerates before it bursts into a confident tempo with a driving ostinato played by the piano, building to a climactic finish. In “Canto Y Libertad”, Diana Saez and Suzette Ortiz adapt the Afro-Latino Bomba style from Puerto Rico into a 4-part piece for women’s chorus, piano, and percussion ensemble of wood blocks, maracas, and congas. The Bomba is music of survival and resistance that originated from communities of people enslaved during the European colonial period. This particular style is the Yubá, a more moderate tempo form that is rendered in a 6/8 rhythm. This Yubá features a recurring call and response section sung with syllables (traditionally, a way to facilitate participation for people from different West African regions who spoke different languages) which interchanges with sections of lyrics in Spanish: “Come, sing with me for freedom!” Elaine Hagenberg’s “Measure Me, Sky!” was commissioned by the Nashville School of the Arts for the 2023 National American Choral Directors Association Conference. The text comes from a poem by poet and violinist Leonora Speyer (1872-1956) that is full of words that illustrate the embodiment of flight: “Sky, be my depth/Wind, be my width and my height.” Hagenberg paints these words with expansive melismatic triplet phrases that are extended through deft hand-offs between higher and lower voices. This energy is matched with triplet figures in the piano that drive the rhythmic charge and soar alongside. VOX Carnegie Spotlight Hildegard von Bingen was a 12th century German Benedictine abbess and mystic, and an influential voice in the medieval Catholic Church. In addition to running her monastery, interpreting and transcribing her visions, writing religious and medical texts, and preaching publicly (something that women were otherwise not allowed to do) Hildegard also composed liturgical music for her nuns to sing, and several of these pieces - including “O viridissima virga” - were compiled into a cycle called Symphonia. It is likely that her nuns were rather talented singers; in comparison to other monophonic chants of the time, Hildegard’s melodies have exceptionally wide ranges and difficult leaps. She also matched her melodic writing to the character of the text, another unusual compositional nuance for religious plainchant. This piece is a song of praise to the Virgin Mary, comparing her to the beauty of nature in motion: green branches and beautiful flowers springing forth and radiating anew, offering hope like the newness of Spring. For “The Tree of Peace”, Gwyneth Walker adapted lyrics from the poem O Brother Man by John Greenleaf Whittier (1807-1892). Walker writes: The text for The Tree of Peace has been adapted from the Quaker poem, “O Brother Man,“ by John Greenleaf Whittier (1807-1892). This contemporary adaptation of the poem broadens the scope of the original with more inclusive language, opening with, “O, my brother and my sister, all who walk upon this earth, fold to your hearts each other.” A new text fragment, "Listen, listen to one another," is introduced into the poem, and serves as an interlude between the stanzas. The final sentence of the original poem becomes the focal point of this work, returning many times. “Love shall tread out the fire of anger, and in its ashes plant a tree of peace.” The musical setting reflects the dual nature of the ti”le, tree (strength) and Peace (tenderness). The work opens with accented chords in the piano accompaniment. These chords are marked “with strength.” This is the conviction of the Tree of Peace. The tender aspects are introduced in the arpeggio patterns in the piano. These are marked “flowing.” And the related choral phrases refer to humanity (“O, my brother and my sister"), to mercy and to the peace of the Lord. Passages of tenderness alternate and intertwine with passages of strength to form a confluence of the message: a prayer for peace. Also known as the Black national anthem, “Lift Ev’ry Voice and Sing” was written by James Weldon Johnson in 1900 and set to music by J. Rosamond Johnson in 1905 as a hymnsong of thanksgiving and an expression of faith and freedom. Zanaida Robles’s arrangement builds in forces and strength as it goes, starting with a soloist gently singing, the choir picking up her melody in unison at first, breaking into harmony as tension builds in the piano. The tension breaks in a cry against injustice, voices reaching a point of disunity that still retains hope for unification as they echo one another. The soloist leads the group into a final statement of truth, freedom, and belonging for all to partake: “Lift ev’ry voice!” Closing Set We close our concert with a set of music that celebrates our community – the support we give and have been given, sacrifices made, and love that is shared. Susan LaBarr wrote “We Remember Them” in memory of Hardus and Dalene Scheepers (1962-2017), parents of choral conductor Gerrit Scheeper of Brooklyn Choral Artists (South Africa). The text by Rabbi Sylvan Kamens and Rabbi Jack Riemer was first published in 1975 in the Gates of Prayer: A New Union Prayerbook. This gentle elegy pulls us steadfastly through three iterations of the refrain, repeating the assurance: “As long as we live, they too will live, for they are now a part of us, we remember them.” “Warrior Song” by women’s folk band The Wyrd Sisters is a narrative of a woman’s coming to maturity – once too afraid to fight, then too disillusioned, she finally heeds the cries of her sisters and her own cries to at last become a warrior for womankind. Premiering tonight, another commission by VOX Femina Los Angeles. In “When I Become an Old Woman,” Sherry Blevins celebrates the freedoms that come from reaching an age when we no longer care about what anyone thinks of us. In her notes to the performers, Blevins writes: “…most of all, have fun being saucy, a little naughty, and all the good things we plan to be when one day... we too are old!” Her published poetry collections The Heart of a Woman (1918), which inspired the title of Maya Angelou’s 1981 autobiography, and Bronze (1922) both addressed issues faced by women of color. In “When I Rise Up,” composer Zachary J. Moore sets two of Johnson’s poems in one piece: “When I Rise Up,” published in Bronze, and a self-published poem from the end of her life, “Your World.” The span of the two works encompasses the experience of a person’s lifetime: from youthful dreams and ambitions, to looking back upon life’s struggles and accomplishments, and preparing to pass on the possibilities to the next generation.

Click HERE for a printable pdf version of these notes!

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Holley Replogle-Wong is a Lecturer in Musicology at University of California, Los Angeles, and the Program Director of the UCLA Center for Musical Humanities. She has taught courses on film music, popular music, American musical theater, and western music history at UC Berkeley, Chapman University, and UCLA. She is also a regular speaker for the LA Opera Connects educational outreach programs.

 

Her research interests include topics in musical theater, voice, fandom studies, 19th- and 20th-century American cultural hierarchies, classical crossover, and film and video game music. She has music-directed musical theater productions at UCLA and for primary and secondary schools, sung with various vocal ensembles (including VOX!) and for the occasional film soundtrack.

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In Her Image
June 2, 2024 – 4 PM
Zipper Concert Hall at The Colburn School
Lisa Edwards, collaborative pianist

Carnegie Hall Festival Chorus

One With the Wind

David O.

Lyrics by Larissa FastHorse

Commissioned by Vox Femina Los Angeles through a gift from Donna Burroughs

 in honor of her spouse Dr Maureen A Peterson - November 2014

Ashley Sheagley, solo

Catherine Card, Mary Read, Missy Nieto, trio

Seranata Treble Choir, Los Osos High School

Bethany Encina, Director

Lisa Edelstein, Flute

The Girl with the Numbers

I Want to Die While you Love Me

Marie-Claire Saindon

Rosephanye Powell

Commissioned by VOX Femina Los Angeles and members of the

2013 ACDA Women’s Choir Commission Consortium

Searching for Dark Matter

Jocelyn Hagen

Lisa Edelstein, alto flute,

Lauren Kosty, Peyton Esraelian, percussion

Commissioned by National Concerts for the June 8, 2024

National Treble Chorus performance at Carnegie Hall

Canto' E Libertad

Miriam Suzzette Ortiz

Diana Saez

Sonia Ohan, Jessica Rau, soloists

Lauren Kosty, Peyton Esraelian, Helen Mendoza, Percussion

Premiere Performance

SSAA version commissioned by VOX Femina Los Angeles

Measure Me, Sky!

Elaine Hagenberg

INTERMISSION

VOX Carnegie Spotlight Set

O viridissima virga

Hildegard von Bingen

Lesili Beard, singing bowl

The Tree of Peace

Lift Ev'ry Voice and Sing

Gwyneth Walker

J Rosamond Johnson

arr. Zanaida Robles

Angelica Rowell, soloist

Our Community

We Remember Them

Warrior Song

When I Become an Old Woman

Susan LaBarr

The Wyrd Sisters

Sherry Blevins

Auxenia Privett-Mendoza, dancer

Premiere Performance

Commissioned by VOX Femina Los Angeles

Missy Nieto, soloist

When I Rise Up

Zachary J. Moore

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Jocelyn Hagen composes music that has been described as “simply magical” (Fanfare Magazine) and “dramatic and deeply moving” (Star Tribune, Minneapolis/St. Paul). She is a pioneer in the field of composition, pushing the expectations of musicians and audiences with large-scale multimedia works, electro-acoustic music, dance, opera, and publishing. Her first forays into composition were via songwriting, still very evident in her work. The majority of her compositions are for the voice: solo, chamber and choral. Her melodic music is rhythmically driven and texturally complex, rich in color and deeply heartfelt.

 

In 2019 and 2020, choirs and orchestras across the country are premiering her multimedia symphony The Notebooks of Leonardo da Vinci that includes video projections created by a team of visual artists, highlighting da Vinci’s spectacular drawings, inventions, and texts. Hagen describes her process of composing for choir, orchestra and film simultaneously in a Tedx Talk given at the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis, now available on YouTube.

 

Hagen’s commissions include Conspirare, the Minnesota Opera, the Minnesota Orchestra, Voces8, the International Federation of Choral Music, the American Choral Directors Association of Minnesota, Georgia, Connecticut and Texas, the North Dakota Music Teachers Association, Cantus, the Boston Brass, the Metropolitan Symphony Orchestra and the St. Olaf Band, among many others. Her work is independently published through JH Music, as well as through Graphite Publishing, G. Schirmer, EC Schirmer, Fred Bock Music Publishing, Santa Barbara Music Publishing, and Boosey and Hawkes.

Miriam Suzzette Ortiz is an accomplished pianist, composer, arranger, choral conductor, recording artist and music educator. Her work as a music teacher has been well recognized, with countless awards and commendations for empowering inner-city students through choral music. Suzzette retired from full-time teaching after 32 years of service; 27 of those in the City of Camden, New Jersey. Her high school choirs achieved first and second place awards in Italy, Prague, Puerto Rico, Ghana, Poland, Virginia, Nashville, Tennessee, New York City, New Orleans and Orlando, Florida.

Suzzette continues to serve as an advocate of music education in her community. She is the former Artistic Director at Artistas y Musicos Latino Americanos (AMLA) music school in Philadelphia. Suzzette strives to create social change through music. She is a certified music practitioner and provides harp comfort music at bedsides in hospitals, nursing facilities and hospice. She is currently recording a CD of comfort music designated to provide comfort to those in need.

Suzzette holds a Bachelors degree in piano performance with a minor in composition from the Conservatory of Puerto Rico, and a Master Degree in music education from Temple University in Philadelphia.

She has arranged and composed choral music for Hal Leonard, J.W.Pepper, La Voz Publishing company, GIA, Oregon Catholic Press and World Library publications. Some of her work has been commissioned by Chorus America, Eugene Rodgers, Rollo Dillworth and Singing City in Philadelphia.

 

Overcoming many social and cultural obstacles to share her message of hope and love though music, Suzzette Ortiz is truly making a difference!

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Diana V. Sáez, DMA, is a leading specialist in the field of Latin American music and an accomplished choral conductor. She is frequently invited as guest conductor, adjudicator and lecturer in the United States and abroad. 

Dr. Sáez was the founder and artistic director of Cantigas, a chamber choir that she founded with the mission to increase awareness and appreciation of the many rich styles of Latin America and Spanish choral music. For 25 years Cantigas was a principal performer of Latin American music, with appearances at the ACDA Eastern Division Convention, Kennedy Center, Strathmore Center, museums and embassies, as well as international tours in Colombia, Argentina, Venezuela, 

Puerto Rico and Cuba. In 2014, the choir was awarded the Choral Excellence Award for Most Creative Programming by the Choralis Foundation in Washington, DC. 

Diana Sáez is an active member of Chorus America, and the American Choral Directors’ Association. In June 2015, Ms. Sáez was a guest panelist at the ACDA’s Second National Symposium on American Choral Music – The Music of Latin America in Austin, Texas. 

In addition to Cantigas, Dr. Sáez was the artistic director of the World Bank-IMF Chorus for sixteen years and directed the Catholic University Women’s Choir for six years. 

Dr. Sáez began her musical education at the Escuela Libre de Música in San Juan, PR. She earned a Master of Choral Conducting from Temple University, and a Doctorate in Musical Arts at the University of Maryland in College Park. Among her mentors and teachers are Violeta De la Mata, Alan Harler and Dr. Edward Maclary. 

Her choral music and arrangements are published by Boosey and Hawkes and by the Roger Dean Publishing Company, a division of The Lorenz Corporation.

Sherry Blevins is a sought-after artist, award-winning composer, lyricist, as well as an award-winning music educator and conductor. Since 2017, she has 27 publications with 5 different publishing houses and has been honored to compose and work with a variety of ensembles around the world including Canada, Italy, China, Alaska, and across the United States. She will premiere a new work with National Concerts at Carnegie Hall in June 2024 and again with MidAmerica in July of 2025 where she will premiere a major, multi-movement work called “Tipping Point.”

 

Sherry has a bachelor’s degree in music education with a principal in voice from the University of North Carolina at Greensboro and a master’s degree in choral conducting from Appalachian State University. She currently resides with her wife, Ruth, in Huntersville, North Carolina. Her hope is that whether through composing or teaching, that the music she shares will bring hope, life, and light to others.

 

Contact Sherry at sherryblevinsmusic.com.

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Texts & translations

For a printable pdf version, please click HERE

One With the Wind

David O. & Larissa FastHorse

Inside this body, no one here but me. No one in here but me. Me. Misnala. Alone, I fight the wind. Alone I fight the wind. Though my body aches, and my mind is weary, and my heart breaks, Alone, I fight my wind. My mother, my daughter, my sisters… Tiwahe. We build the wall to shield you. We build the wall to shield you. We build the wall so you can fight the wind. In the circle, in the circle, in the circle, we stand against the wind. Tioshpaye. Tioshpaye. Tioshpaye. My daughters, my sisters… We walk together, we work together. We help each other, We hold each other. Let the wind cool you, let the wind soothe you, let the wind move you. Do not fear the wind. Do not fear the wind. Tioshpaye. Together we face the wind. All mothers, all daughters, all sisters, Oyate. We face the North for fortitude, we face the East for wisdom, we face the South for a generous spirit, we face the West for courage. From the four corners of the Earth, the wind blows over us all. From the four corners of the Earth, the wind blows over us all. Together we rise, together we fly, together, we sail on the wind. The one breath of the Earth. The one breath blows through us. The one breath inside of us. We are one with the wind. One with the wind. We are one with the wind. One with the wind. Hoka Hey!

The Girl with the Numbers

Marie-Claire Saindon

Can a Black student take part as a scholar, a classmate can “separate but equal” finally unite? Why not? I am no better than anyone, but no one is better than me. Can a woman pioneer as an expert, a master can a “computer in skirts” change the script? Why not? I am no better than anyone, but no one is better than me. Can a Black woman challenge as a colleague, an equal c an the “girl with the numbers” balance the question and reach for the moon? Why not? I am no better than anyone, but no one is better than me.

I Want to Die While You Love Me

Rosephanye Powell

I want to die while you love me While yet you hold me fair, While laughter lies upon my lips And lights are in my hair. I want to die while you love me, And bear to that still bed, Your kisses turbulent, unspent To warm me when I’m dead. I want to die while you love me Oh, who would care to live Till love has nothing more to ask And nothing more to give? I want to die while you love me And never, never see The glory of this perfect day Grow dim or cease to be!

Searching for Dark Matter

Jocelyn Hagen

For this we go out dark nights, searching For the dimmest stars, For signs of unseen things: To weigh us down. To stop the universe From rushing on Into its own beyond on and on Till it exhausts itself and lies down cold, Its last star going out. Whatever they turn out to be, Let there be swarms of them, Enough for immortality, Always a star where we can warm ourselves. Let there be enough to bring it back From its own edges, To bring us all so close we ignite The bright spark of resurrection. Bright spark. Always a bright spark.

Canto Y Libertad

Miriam Suzette Ortiz & Diana Saez

Come, sing with me this Yuba song! (La la la) Come, sing following the Yuba rhythm, sing with me for freedom! Today, I invite you to reflect (on freedom) while I sing this Yuba. And if you want to change the world, bring freedom into your life. Let's give each person their space, To fight for equality. Make the drums sound, for freedom. Let this song travel, for freedom. Let's sing all together, for freedom. Let the children sing, for freedom. No more prejudices, for freedom. Stop the violence, for freedom. Come, sing following the Yuba rhythm, for freedom!

Measure Me, Sky!

Elaine Hagenberg

Measure me, sky! Tell me I reach by a song Nearer the stars; I have been little so long. Horizon, reach out! Catch at my hands, stretch me taut, Rim of the world: Widen my eyes by a thought. Sky, be my depth, Wind, be my width and my height, World, my heart’s span; Loveliness, wings for my flight.

O viridissima virga

Hildegard von Bingen

Hail! O greenest branch that went forth in the windy gusts of the saints’ discernment. When the time came for you to blossom on your branches, “Hail! Hail!” was said to you, because the heat of the sun produced sweat like the fragrance of balsam on you. For in you a beautiful flower bloomed, which gave scent to all the spices which were dry. And they all appeared in full freshness. Whence the heavens poured dew over the grass and the whole earth was made happy since its womb produced grain and since the birds of the sky had nests on it. From there food for humans was made, and the great joy of banqueters. Whence, o sweet Virgin, no joy is lacking in you. All these things Eve scorned. But now let there be praise to the Most High.

The Tree of Peace

Gwyneth Walker

O my sister and my brother, all who walk upon this earth, fold to your hearts each other; Where mercy dwells, the peace of the Lord is there. To live rightly is to love on another, Each kindness a gift, each deed a prayer. O my sister and my brother, fold to your hearts each other; Listen, listen to one another Walk with reverence in the steps of those who have gone before, where forgiveness and wisdom have stood. So shall the wide earth become our temple, Each loving life a psalm of gratitude. Then shall all shackles fall. The violence of war over the earth shall cease Love shall tread out the fire of anger, And in its ashes plant the tree of peace!

Lift Ev'ry Voice and Sing

J. Rosamond Johnson

arr. Zanaida Robles

Lift every voice and sing Till earth and heaven ring, Ring with the harmonies of Liberty; Let our rejoicing rise High as the listening skies, Let it resound loud as the rolling sea. Sing a song full of the faith that the dark past has taught us, Sing a song full of the hope that the present has brought us, Facing the rising sun of our new day Begun let us march on till victory is won. Stony the road we trod, Bitter the chastening rod, Felt in the days when hope unborn had died; Yet with a steady beat, Have not our weary feet Come to the place for which our parents sighed? We have come over a way That with tears have been watered, We have come, treading our path Through the blood of the slaughtered. We have come over a way That with tears have been watered, We have come, treading our path Through the blood of the slaughtered. Out from the gloomy past, Where the white gleam of our bright star is cast. God of our weary years, God of our silent tears, Thou who hast brought us thus far on our way. Thou who has by Thy might Led us into the light, Keep us forever in the path, we pray. Lest our feet stray from the places, Our God, where we met Thee, Lest, our hearts drunk with the wine Of the world, we forget Thee; Shadowed beneath Thy hand, May we forever stand. True to our God, Truey to our God True to our native land. Lift ev'ry voice and sing!

We Remember Them

Susan LaBarr

At the blueness of the skies and in the warmth of summer; At the opening of the buds and in the rebirth of spring; At the rising sun and at its going down; We remember them, We remember them. At the blowing of the wind and in the chill of winter; At the rustling of the leaves and in the beauty of autumn; At the start of the year and when it ends; We remember them, we remember them. As long as we live, they too will live; As long as we live, they are a part of us. They will live, as long as we live, we remember them. When we are weary and in need of strength; When we are lost and sick at heart; When we have joy we crave to share; We remember them, we remember them. A long as we live, they too will live, as long as we live, they are a part of us. They will live, as long as we live, we remember them. When we are wewary, when we are lost, In chill of winter, they are part of us. In warmth of summer, in blue skies, when we have joy, we remember them. As long as we live, they too will live, they will live. As long as we live, they are part of us, the will live. As long as we live, we remember them, As long as we live, we remember them.

Warrior Song

The Wyrd Sisters

I was a shy and lonely girl With the heavens in my eyes And as I walked along the lane I heard the echoes of her cries I cannot fight I cannot a warrior be It's not my nature nor my teaching It is the womanhood in me I was a lost and angry youth There were no tears in my eyes I saw no justice in my world Only the echoes of her cries I cannot fight I cannot a warrior be It's not my nature nor my teaching It is the womanhood in me I am an older woman now And I will heed my own cries And I will a fierce warrior be 'til not another woman dies I can and will fight I can and will a warrior be It is my nature and my duty It is the womanhood in me.

When I Become an Old Woman

Susan LaBarr

When I become an old woman, when I become and old woman, I’ll be magnetic. It’s genetic. When I become and old woman, an old woman, I’ll be vivacious, Extra loquacious. I’ll lose my filter, and say exactly what I’m thinking. I’ll learn to tango, I will dance like nobody’s watching. I’ll never worry when people pass judgment, Poor saps don’t know what they’re missing! I’ll give up plucking, embrace my inner Yeti. I will wear stretchy pants and never bother with zippers or button flies (Who has time for buttons?) I’ll toss my bras away! Say goodbye to my underwire prison! When I become an old woman, when I become an old woman, my purse could hold the kitchen sink (the whole sink!) It will be hot pink! When I become an old woman, when I become an old woman. I will be brassy, and oh, so sassy! When I become an old woman, I will dance the tango! La, dee, da, dee, la, dee, da!

When I Rise Up

Zachary J. Moore

When I rise up, above the air and I look down on the things that fetter me. I beat my wings upon the air, or tranquil lie oh surge after surge of potent strength, like incense comes back to me, when I rise. Your world is as big as you make it I know, for I used to abide in the narrowest nest in a corner My wings pressing close to my side But I sighted a distant horizon Where the skyline encircled the sea And I throbbed with a burning desire To travel this immensity. When I rise up, above the air and I look down on the things that fetter me. I beat my wings upon the air, or tranquil lie oh when I Rise up, when I Rise, when I rise. I battered the cordons around me And cradled my wings on the breeze Then soared to the utmost reaches with rapture with pow’r with ease Surge after surge of potent strength, like incense comes back to me, when I rise. When I rise up, above the air and I look down on the things that fetter me. I beat my wings upon the air, or tranquil lie Oh when I rise up, when I rise, when I rise. When I rise, when I rise!

Acknowledgments

AV Manager: Francesco Perlangeli

AV Technicians: Sergey Parfanov & Derek Williams

Graphic Design: Kate Jordan

Proofreader: Laurie Fox

Music Librarian: Michele Mulidor

Special Thanks to Bethany Encina and all the students in the Los Osos High School Advanced Treble Choir, Serenata, for singing with us today.

Thank you to all our volunteers this afternoon who are ushering, assisting with Will Call, and making this concert a stellar experience for our audience, and to all the friends and family members who volunteer their services to support VOX throughout the year.

"This concert is supported, in part, by a grant from the  LA County Department of Arts and Culture.

VOX also receives  generous support from the following organizations:

California Arts Council, Chorus America, The City of Culver City, The City of Los Angeles Department of Cultural Affairs, The City of West Hollywood, The Confidence Foundation, Pasadena Showcase House for the Arts, The Ralph M. Parsons Foundation, and The Perenchio Foundation.

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